A City the Size of Kansas

Here’s a question — is there a limit to how large a city can be and still be considered a city (as opposed to a province/state or region)? That question popped into my mind when I read an article in The New York Times recently about China’s plans to create a super-city by combining Beijing with some of its surrounding cities and provinces.

For decades, China’s government has tried to limit the size of Beijing, the capital, through draconian residency permits. Now, the government has embarked on an ambitious plan to make Beijing the center of a new supercity of 130 million people.

The planned megalopolis, a metropolitan area that would be about six times the size of New York’s, is meant to revamp northern China’s economy and become a laboratory for modern urban growth.

“The supercity is the vanguard of economic reform,” said Liu Gang, a professor at Nankai University in Tianjin who advises local governments on regional development. “It reflects the senior leadership’s views on the need for integration, innovation and environmental protection.”

The new region will link the research facilities and creative culture of Beijing with the economic muscle of the port city of Tianjin and the hinterlands of Hebei Province, forcing areas that have never cooperated to work together.

To accompany the article, Jonah Kessel produced this excellent video to give you a glimpse of what this new “city” will be like.

And note this:

But the new supercity is intended to be different in scope and conception. It would be spread over 82,000 square miles, about the size of Kansas, and hold a population larger than a third of the United States.

So, to my original question — is a city the size of Kansas really a city?

Mr. Upham and the Bell

In my post from a couple of weeks ago titled A Tale of Two Bells, I wrote about finding 2 old bells hanging in church steeples in southern Sichuan Province. Both were cast in Cincinnatti, OH, and both are still being used in what were Baptist churches before 1949.

As I mentioned in that post, the inscription on one of the bells read:  “Buckeye Bell Foundry, 1886.”  The rest of the inscription read:  “First Baptist Church, Coffeyville, Kansas. Presented by W.S. Upham 1886. Praise Ye the Lord.”

Among the numerous questions that Noel and I pondered was who in the world was W.S. Upham?

A commenter on Noel’s blog Tell Me When to Pack did some poking around on the internet and turned up a link to a digitized version of the book History of the State of Kansas, by William G. Cultler. Part 11 of the book is a list of biographical sketches of notable persons in Montgomery County, where Coffeyville is located.

Here is what is written about a W.S. Upham:

W. S. UPHAM merchant, was born in the Cherokee Nation, April 13, 1845, his father, Rev. Willard P. Upham, coming among those Indians as a missionary in 1841. W. S. Upham went to San Francisco in December, 1865, and was engaged in the mercantile business there for seven years. He had spent one year in Boston, and one year at school in Vermont prior to going to California. He was married in San Francisco, May 15, 1873, to Emma A. Morgan, a native of Cleveland, Ohio. They have three children – Willard M., Maggie May, and George Newhall, the latter was named for his uncle, George Newhall, a prominent wholesale merchant of San Francisco. Mr. Upham is a member of the First Baptist Church, of San Francisco. He came to Coffeyville in the spring of 1873, where he has built up a large business, in addition to merchandising, dealing in grain, hides, furs, etc.

Given that he was a member of the First Baptist Church in San Francisco before moving to Coffeyville, it is reasonable to assume that the First Baptist Church in Coffeyville became his church home when he moved there.

Now…..why did he give the bell to the church, and when (and why) did they ship it to China?

Stay tuned…….