A Bell in Larkana

Last week I received an email from a friend that had attached to it several pictures of a bell. They were taken by a friend of his who had recently been traveling in Pakistan and had come upon a bell in a church compound in Larkana, a city in the province of Sindh.

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Yes, you are reading that correctly — the inscription is “Crocodile!” A friend who saw the photo thought it looked liked a bell from a ship. Sure enough, there was an HMS Crocodile. Here’s what the Wikipedia entry has to say about it:

She was built for the transport of troops between the United Kingdom and the Indian sub-continent, and was operated by the Royal Navy. She carried up to 1,200 troops and family on a passage of approximately 70 days. She was commissioned in April 1870 under Captain G H Parkin.

Crocodile was re-engined rather later in life than her sisters, with her single-expansion steam engine replaced with a more efficient compound-expansion type.[Note 1]

Crocodiles last voyage began at Bombay in October 1893. On 3 November, as she was approaching Aden, the high-pressure steam cylinder exploded and the ship came to a halt. The next day she was towed to an anchorage near Aden. [2] Most of the soldiers and their families were brought home on other ships. Crocodileeventually arrived back at Portsmouth on 30 December 1893, having travelled using only the low-pressure steam cylinder, and was not further employed for trooping.[3]

In 1894 it was sold for scrap.

There is a place along the coast in Pakistan, in Gaddani, where ships are scrapped. Maybe they were already breaking up ships there in the late 1800’s. Maybe that’s where Crocodile was scrapped and from where the bell began its journey up country to Larkana.

Maybe…..

So, it seems like I may need to plan a bell-hunting trip to Pakistan. Who wants to join me?

And of course, you can read stories of church bells China in my book The Bells Are Not Silent: Stories of Church Bells in China.

Note: this post was originally titled “A Bell in Sukkur” because I mistakenly thought the bell was in the city of Sukkur. The title has been edited, and a section about Sukkur has been removed. I apologize for the confusion. 

 

Regional Rivalries

We have a joke here in Minnesota: “What’s the best thing to come out of Iowa?” “Interstate 35.” Apologies to my Iowan friends, but I’m sure that you just turn the joke around anyway.

An interesting feature of life in the United States is the rivalries that exist between various regions and states. Some rivalries are sports-based, some are rooted in cultural or perceived cultural differences.

I recently ran across this fun cartoon that depicts how various states in the midwest view each other.

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Regional rivalries or stereotypes exist in China as well. Beijingers generally look down on everyone, as do people from Shanghai. People from Shanghai think that Beijingers are only interested in politics and Beijingers think Shanghai people are money-grubbing. The northeast is considered by the rest of the country to be full of drunks, and everyone thinks that people in Guangdong only think about making money.

What are the regional rivalries in your area?

Image source: @BestPixMN

Friday Photo: Banquet Hall

China celebrates International Women’s Day every year on March 8. Usually what that means is women in the workplace are hosted to a lunch or perhaps given the afternoon off. When I taught at a university in China, my classes were in the morning, so I always felt a bit cheated when the school officials proudly announced that we didn’t have to work in the afternoon.

When I lived in Beijing I occasionally got to attend a Women’s Day luncheon, hosted for foreign women in the city at the Great Hall of the People, China’s main government building. The event was held in the banquet hall, which can host a sit-down banquet for 10,000 people!

As you can see, this photo was taken awhile ago. The waitresses are all soldiers isn the People’s Liberation Army (PLA).

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I always enjoyed the chance to visit this historic place where President Nixon dined with Premier Zhou En-lai in 1972.

My Least Favorite Smell

We all have certain smells that we don’t like. My list is varied —  stinky doufu (tofu), port-a-potties, certain perfumes, and yes, even coffee!!

On Monday I added a new one to my list: the smell of blood vessels being burned.

Make that the smell of MY blood vessels being burned.

For the second time in 2 1/2 years, I had surgery to remove a basal cell cancerous doodad (I think the scientific term is tumor or lesion) on my face.

I noticed something suspicious on my cheek 3 weeks ago and made an appointment to see a dermatologist. She performed a biopsy last Tuesday, and on Friday the lab called to tell me the results were positive. The surgeon had an opening on Monday morning, so I was able to get it taken care of right away.

The procedure he used is called Mohs Surgery, an outpatient procedure in which layers of skin and tissue are removed until all trace of the cancer is gone. In my case that meant cutting a hole in my cheek the size of a quarter and a 1/4 inch deep. Don’t worry; I won’t show you a picture.

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As part of the procedure, the surgeon had to cauterize a few blood vessels. And in case you’re wondering what that means, here’s a definition:

to burn with a hot iron, electric current, fire, or a caustic, especially for curative purposes

As I said, it’s my new least favorite smell, and unfortunately, one I will never forget!

Image source: CallaDerm.com

 

A Snowy Wall

We may be snowless this winter here in the Twin Cities, but there was snow in the mountains outside of Beijing earlier this month. Dutch photographer Tom van Dillen captured the beauty of the Great Wall under a blanket of snow with his drone:

Wow!

Related Posts:

The Great Wall by Drone

A Miniature Great Wall

The Great Wall: Fact or Fantasy

No Great Wall from Space

Port-a-Potties at the Wall

Winter Wall

Friday Photo: St. Paul’s Church

One of the bells I write about in my book, The Bells Are Not Silent: Stories of Church Bells in China hangs in the bell tower of this old Lutheran church in Qingdao.

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Here’s how the chapter opens:

Amy and I slipped quietly into the pew at the old St. Paul’s Church in Qingdao, now known simply as Guanxiang Road Christian Church. An usher, who for some reason was dressed in a gleaming white suit that seemed more suitable for a night out in Las Vegas than a Chinese church, spotted us, smiled, and came over to where we were sitting.

Uh-oh, I thought. He’s going to ask us to leave.

Guess you’ll have to get the book to learn the rest of the story!