Friday Photo: St. Paul’s Church

One of the bells I write about in my book, The Bells Are Not Silent: Stories of Church Bells in China hangs in the bell tower of this old Lutheran church in Qingdao.

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Here’s how the chapter opens:

Amy and I slipped quietly into the pew at the old St. Paul’s Church in Qingdao, now known simply as Guanxiang Road Christian Church. An usher, who for some reason was dressed in a gleaming white suit that seemed more suitable for a night out in Las Vegas than a Chinese church, spotted us, smiled, and came over to where we were sitting.

Uh-oh, I thought. He’s going to ask us to leave.

Guess you’ll have to get the book to learn the rest of the story!

 

Twin Bells?

The second bell that Noël Piper and I found in China was at a church in Ya’an, Sichuan Province. Like the bell we had found the day before, this one was cast in a foundry in Cincinnati, Ohio. The pastor didn’t know what had happened to the bell during the Cultural Revolution, and how it had survived. She did know, however, that it had been taken from the old church building (no longer standing) in the 1960s and returned in the 1980s.

BW yaan bell

Inside the main entryway of the downtown campus of Bethlehem Baptist Church in Minneapolis sits a giant black bell tucked unceremoniously in the corner. Unless you’re paying attention, you will probably not even notice it. But as you can see, there is a striking similarity to the bell in Ya’an. Hmm…

BW bbcbell

Is that just a coincidence, or is there an actual link between the old bell at Bethlehem Baptist Church and the one in Ya’an? In order to learn the answer to that question, you’ll have to read my book, The Bells Are Not Silent: Stories of Church Bells in China OR come on out to the north campus of Bethlehem on Saturday, February 11 at 6:30PM.

I will be telling the story of these bells as well as few others I found in China. As fun as the stories are, however, the bells also serve as vehicles for telling the story of God’s faithfulness to the church in China.

And speaking of fun, here’s a bonus photo of a very young Pastor John Piper with the old Bethlehem church bell! (Thanks, Noël!)

old bbc bell

Event details:

Bethlehem Baptist Church (north campus)
5151 Program Ave.
Mounds View, MN
Time: 6:30PM

If you’re in the Twin Cities, come on over!

Friday Photo: Delivering Coal

Snapped one afternoon during a stroll through one of Beijing’s remaining hutong (lane) neighborhoods. So much going on: the man delivering coal briquettes; the fresh fruit; the umbrellas. the sign for donkey meat hot pot; the “family style restaurant;” the white sky.

Beijing hutong

Sigh. I do miss Beijing!

 

Bell Talk and Book Signing

I have two “Bell Talk and Book Signing” events coming up in the Twin Cities this weekend and next weekend.

The Bells Are Not Silent: Stories of Church Bells in China

Here are the details:

Saturday, February 4 @ Bethlehem Baptist Church (downtown campus)
720 8th Ave. S. Minneapolis
Time: 7:15PM (following the evening service)

Saturday, February 11 @ Bethlehem Baptist Church (north campus)
5151 Program Ave., Mounds View
Time: 6:30PM

Noël Piper will be my special guest; we will share background on the genesis of the book and some of the stories..

Here’s a snippet to whet your appetite:

Pastor Zhao fetched a ladder but refused to let Noël or me climb up there. He was happy that we were there, but no way was he going to risk having two injured foreign women on his hands! Ben, who is younger and much more athletic, grabbed his flashlight and scampered up to get a good look at the inscription. It was from this perch, high up in the steeple, that he read the inscription to us.

I will have copies of the book to sell, and will even sign them if you want!

If you’re in the Twin Cities, come on out! If you can’t make it to these, I’m hoping to have more such events schedule in March.

 

Don’t Do This in Shanghai

22 years ago, in an effort to improve the social environment of Shanghai, the city government issued a list of 7 “Don’ts” — behaviors that the citizens were to avoid. It was an attempt to eradicate the bad habits of Shanghai citizens. They included things like spitting, smoking in public, and cursing.

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Earlier this month the office of the Shanghai Spiritual Civilization Construction Commission (what’s not to love about that name?) issued an updated list, one designed to address more modern bad habits.

Here the are:

  1. Don’t let pets disturb neighbors.
  2. Don’t cut in line.
  3. Don’t park vehicles in a disorderly manner.
  4. Don’t waste food.
  5. Don’t make noise.
  6. Don’t jaywalk.
  7. Don’t litter.

If you’re heading to Shanghai in the near future, you might want to keep this list handy!

Related Posts:

Do’s and Don’ts

Eight Glories, Eight Disgraces

Walking Backwards Through Shanghai

Shanghai Sidewalk Cafe

Shanghai!

Shanghai Books

Battle Zone Shanghai

 

Image credit: by Alfred Weidinger, via Flickr

 

Friday Photo: Easy Rider

On a late summer afternoon in Beijing, I parked myself on the side of a busy road and snapped pictures of people on their evening commute. This was my favorite.

She was riding due west, into a bright sun, hence the “Darth Vader” hat. And if you think it’s purpose is to merely shield her eyes from the sun, you’d be mistaken. It is to keep the sun from darkening her skin.

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You may recognize this as the cover photo on my book, Survival Chinese Lessons.